Title: Brain-like computing using disordered dopant networks in silicon

Speaker: Peter Bobbert (CCER)
Time: April 30, 2020, 10:00–11:00
Location: Online (MS Teams)

Abstract
A disordered network that is capable of detecting ordered patterns: it sounds contradictory, but it comes close to the way our brain works. I will discuss in this seminar a system of interacting electrons hopping on a disordered dopant networks in silicon that does precisely this. The complex physics and reconfigurability of this system can be exploited to perform various computing tasks like the recognition of basic patterns. The use of a surrogate model of the system based on a deep neural network allows rapid reconfiguration of the network for a desired computing task without the need of any further experimentation. Coupling of these networks in superstructures can lead to a computing technology that has the potential to outcompete conventional CMOS technology regarding energy consumption and footprint.

The CCER seminars are aimed at researchers interested in computational approaches to (energy) research. The seminar is small-scale, typically 15 participants, and interactive, offering lots of room for discussion. If you would like to attend, just This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. so as to receive the MS Teams meeting link.

Title: On hydrogen penetration into ruthenium

Speaker: Chidozie Onwudinanti (Computational Materials Physics Group, DIFFER)
Time: April 16, 2020, 10:00–11:00
Location: Online seminar (Skype)

Abstract
The multi-layer reflectors used in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) machines have a top layer of ruthenium; the plasma source of the EUV photons is tin; and the buffer/cleaning gas for the reflector in the near-vacuum of the machine is hydrogen. The interaction of these three elements is of critical importance to the operation of the machines, as hydrogen penetration into the ruthenium can result in damage. This presentation gives an overview of the computational study of the diffusion of hydrogen on, in, and into ruthenium, and the effect of tin on this diffusion.

The CCER seminars are aimed at researchers interested in computational approaches to (energy) research. The seminar is small-scale, typically 15 participants, and interactive, offering lots of room for discussion. If you want to attend this online seminar, just This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

CANCELED

Update March 13, 2020. Following the new official guidelines for the province of Brabant and the sharpened Corona policies of TU/e and DIFFER, unfortunately prof. Vlugt's CCER seminar has had to be cancelled.

 

Title: To be determined.

Speaker: Thijs Vlugt (Process & Energy Laboratory TUD)
Time: March 26, 2020, 10:00–11:00
Location: Differ, Alexander-zaal

The CCER seminars are aimed at researchers interested in computational approaches to (energy) research. The seminar is small-scale, typically 15 participants, and interactive, offering lots of room for discussion. If you don't have access to the DIFFER building but would like to attend, just This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

CANCELED

Update March 10, 2020. Following the new official guidelines for the province of Brabant and the sharpened Corona policies of TU/e and DIFFER, unfortunately prof. Lyulin's CCER seminar has had to be cancelled.

 

Title: Machine learning for design of polymers with required macroscopic properties

Speaker: Prof. Sergey Lyulin (St. Petersburg, Russia)
Time: March 12, 2020, 10:00–11:00
Location: Differ, Alexander-zaal

Abstract | The lecture will be focused on different approaches to use computer-aided molecular design to construct polymers with required properties. We will describe our first results based on the genetic algorithm, as well as the Bayesian molecular design, to discover the high-thermally conductive polymers. We will also discuss the possibility to use Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) theory to architect the specialized neural networks.

Bio | Prof. Sergey V. Lyulin is the Director of the Institute of Macromolecular Compounds and Head of the Laboratory of Polymer Theory and Computer Simulations, St. Petersburg, Russia.

The CCER seminars are aimed at researchers interested in computational approaches to (energy) research. The seminar is small-scale, typically 15 participants, and interactive, offering lots of room for discussion. If you don't have access to the DIFFER building but would like to attend, just This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..